Thomas Ismay and Jules Verne

Thomas Ismay and Jules Verne

Postby Timothy Trower on Mon Dec 15, 2008 1:10 am

(This post has been cross-posted in the Oceanic I thread due to news of the ship's repositioning to the Pacific Ocean.)

From the New York Times, June 22, 1880

Jules Verne's Time Outdone
Around the World in Seventy-Five Days
--Notes of a Rapid Voyage

Among the arrivals at the Windsor Hotel on Saturday were Mr. Ismay, of Ismay, Imrie and Co., of Liverpoool, who was accompanied by his wife and son and Mr. and Mrs. Barron. The party had reached this City after a remarkably quick journey around the world. Sailing from Liverpool on March 13 in the Oceanic, the pioneer ship of the White Star Line to New-York, and now plying on the Occidental and Oriental Company's line between Hong Kong, Yokohama, and San Francisco, they reached Suez on March 26. At that point were landed a large party of friends who were to return to England through Egypt and the South of Europe. Among the number were Admiral Gough, C.B., Mr. J. D. Hornby, the Chairman of the Liverpool Dock Board; Mr. John Williamson, a Director in the Cunard Company; Mr. Nelson, Director of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company; Mr. R. N. Dale, of the British and Foreign Insurance Company; Mr. C. J. Bushnell, and Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Jackson, of the Manor House, Birkenhead. Passing Point de Galle on April 7, Penang was reached on April 12, Singapore on April 15, and Hong Kong on April 27, the passage to that port being made in thirty-six and a half days, under steam, and being the fastest on record. Mr. Ismay and his party visited Canton and Shanghai, leaving the latter port on May 1 for Japan. They went by way of Nagasaki, through the great inland sea to Kobe, to Yokohama. Sailing from Yokohama on May 23, the Oceanic carried the party safely across the Pacific Ocean to San Francisco, where they arrived on June 6. When they arrived in New-York they had traveled 22,320 miles. The time occupied in making this journey, exclusive of stoppages at different points visited, was 66 days. Allowing nine days in which to complete the journey to Liverpool, and the trip will be accomplished in 75 days, or five days less that the celebrated journey described in Jules Verne's romantic story, "Around the World in Eighty Days." The voyagers were fortunate in having fine weather nearly the entire trip. The temperature was unusually cool while they were passing through the Red Sea, and exceptionally cold on the Pacific Ocean. The Oceanic brought as part of her cargo 1,500 tons of tea, including the first consignment of the new crop. Mr. Ismay, who visited this country in 1875, expresses himself as much surprised at the increased area of land brought under cultivation along the line of railroad near Omaha and west of Ogden since he last crossed the continent.

Transcribed by Timothy Trower, 2008, and may not be reprinted without written permission.
All the best,

Tim

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Re: Thomas Ismay and Jules Verne

Postby Timothy Trower on Tue Nov 24, 2009 12:14 am

[This has been cross-posted in the Oceanic I thread due to this ship's role in the news story.]

The New York Times
August 23, 1880

AROUND THE WORLD IN 75 DAYS
From the London Telegraph

Mr. Phineas Fogg’s surprising feat of traveling round the world in 80 days has lately been outdone by the chief partner in the firm of Ismay, Imrie & Co., owners of the White Star Line of steamers. This enterprising gentleman, accompanied by his wife and children, left Liverpool on the 23d of last March in the packet Oceanic, and returned thither on the seventy-fifth day from the date of his departure, having in the interim “put a girdle round the earth,” if not exactly after the manner of Ariel. During this unprecedentedly rapid journey of over 25,000 miles, Mr. Ismay touched at Suez, Pont de Galle, Singapore, Hong Kong, Canton, Shanghai, Yokohama, San Francisco, and New-York, which comprehensive tour he contrived to effect in sixty-six days, leaving himself barely nine more for his passage across the Atlantic to his original starting point. Jules Verne’s phlegmatic hero, therefore, can no longer claim to have “circumferenced” the globe in the shortest time on record. Mr. Ismay has beaten him by five full days and nights, and is at present the indisputable champion of fast and indefatigable travelers, having averaged over 330 miles per diem for 75 consecutive days, an achievement which the hardiest Russian state courier or most experienced Queen’s messenger would probably appraise as “bad to beat.”

Transcribed by Timothy Trower, 2009, and may not be reprinted without written permission.
All the best,

Tim

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Timothy Trower
 
Posts: 745
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 8:45 pm
Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA


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